Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Neal, does this bring back memories?

The other day, Neal responded to this post by telling me I forgot the smell of new mown hay--and he was right. It is one of those smells that I love and that take me to childhood. I never see loads of hay like this without thinking of my brothers....and them coming in all hot and dusty. It was a hard job but they did it and never complained that I ever heard.

We didn't own a haybaler or rake either, but my older brother helped two or three other farmers so much that he was always welcome to use their equipment, and I know one of them always baled for him, but don't know if they did the raking. I think he did the raking, and they started bailing, and when George got done raking, they started the process of loading and hauling in the hay.

I think they held the record for getting in the most hay in one day....Neal don't remember this, but I am almost positive I remember them putting up a bit over a 1,000 bails in one day. I don't know who drove for them, I am thinking it might have been my other brother....but it was just George and Neal to load and haul it and put it in the barn. That is the part that makes it a record in my opinion. It was well after dark when they got done.....but it was done.

Well, storms are moving in and Lorelei will be here shortly. I best get moving and get this posted till I can unplug the computers.

13 comments:

Abe Lincoln said...

New Mown Hay smells wonderful. I loved it as long as I didn't have to pitch it with a three pronged pitchfork and later, lift it when hay bales and baling machines became the thing to do. I guess of the two I liked the pitchfork method. And then driving the horse and wagon into the barn and stopping on the barn floor to put a rope from one side of the barn to the other -- passing through the hay wagon at the front -- then driving on and the rope pulled the whole load off the wagon onto the barn floor and then they had this giant hook in the rafters than fell down and hooked a gob of hay and another horse pulled the rope that lifted it up to the haymow. What a process it was. Loved it.

Mary said...

I don't know about Neal, but it sure brings back memories for me of visiting my Grandmother during haying season. We would ride on the wagon and as the bales came off the baler and were stacked we would climb up and sit on them. Around here hay is usually in those big round bales.

don said...

I like the wagons loaded with hay. Your description reminded me of my high school days bucking alfalfa bales back in a second floor of a barn in summer heat that was unreal. Alfalfa has a great aroma too. One of the down sides was the scratched condition my arms had despite long sleeved shirts! :-)

Rose said...

Abe, I don't remember the pitchfork method, but maybe my brothers do. I do remember being in one barn that had loose hay when I was really young.

Mary, Mostly round bales here also...although we have started seeing these HUGE rectangle bales. I would hate to guess how much each one weighs.

Don, I always think of hay as being itchy, but don't know if it bothered my brothers or if that was just me after playing in it.

Neal said...

I've definitely remember the pitchfork method. :) I have a picture (and I think you do too) of a big haystack outside. I can remember the first time we made a big haystack outside because we didn't have enough room in the barn. I was sure it would just rot since the hay would absorb the rain but in reality just the outside of the stack would go bad.

I'd like to know how many bails of hay that I've loaded and unloaded. I can remember doing that until my arms would cramp if I bent them so I'd stiff arm them on and off the wagon/truck.

Deborah Godin said...

I love the smell too. It's not a childhood smell for me, but one I remember very fondly from my previous home!

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Ah---there's nothing better than to smell the new mown hay... OR---as a little girl, I remember how good the new mown grass smelled when my Daddy would mow our big yard. Love that smell!!!!!

Hugs,
Betsy

Carletta said...

This definitely evokes long hot days! My brother and a few of his best friends used to help load hay after school for a neighbor. He would come in so hot, thirsty, and dirty. :)
The sweet smell of hay - I'm surprised you didn't remember it Rose. It always makes me feel good for some reason.
I like the wagons of old-fashioned' square bales juxtaposed with the 'newer' round bales in the background.

Leedra said...

He was right too, but I didn't think of the hay either. In my younger adult days (not as a child) I was the one that drove the truck pulling the hay wagon, except when I would run inside and get the meal ready for the workers.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

I really like the aroma of new-mown hay. A few farmers here are collecting their bales and allowing their fields to grow again too. The fields are beautiful right now.

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Rose: Grew up as a city boy but can remember freah cut hay from fishing trips.

Jacob said...

I've ridden on a haybaler...never again...what a miserable job...you got it, hot and especially dusty! Whew!

George said...

This brings back all kinds of memories. My Dad didn't own a rake or baler, but we helped farmers who had equipment and they then let used the equipment in our field. I was always sick and tired of the sight and smell of hay by the time school started.

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